Janitors: Curse of the Broomstaff {Review}

Ok, you must have known that after I reviewed Janitors and Janitors: Secrets of New Forest Academy that the review for Janitors: Curse of the Broomstaff was in the queue… and you’d be right :)

Janitors: The Curse of the Broomstaff | Ordinary Happily Ever After

Spencer is still reeling from the sudden reappearance of his father when he discovers that, surprise surprise, the BEM is after him.  Mr. Clean wants Alan Zumbro is a big way and he is willing to pull out the big guns to get him.  Manipulating the glorified toxites into weapons of mass destruction, the BEM chases Alan, Spencer, Daisy and their team of Janitors around the country; all the while Spencer and the team try to track down the mysterious package containing the hidden secrets of glop.  Finally they track down the aurans and try to enlist their help in defeating the toxites once and for all.

Curse of the Broomstaff, the third volume in the series, is the best so far.  I just love Tyler Whitesides writing style.  He does such a good job of weaving a deeper meaning in to his books.  Each book seems to have a few themes unique to that volume.  One of the themes in this one seems to be “power corrupts”.  I am continually impressed with how well fantasy writers incorporate modern paradigms and current events into the symbolism of their books.  This is another reason why I enjoy fantasy so much, especially for young people.  Spencer had sought help from those that he should have been able to trust.  Yet, they were far too concerned with holding on to their own power and their meaningless traditions than they were about doing what was right and good.

I was strongly reminded of our current political leaders.  We elect people who are supposed to represent our values but as soon as they get to the capitol they forget what it means to be true to the principles that sent them there to begin with.  They get so caught up in the power that they forget what it was like to live with the consequences of Washington’s decisions.  Curse of the Broomstaff teaches our children that right and wrong DO matter, choosing the right isn’t always easy, and that you should always seek out the truth for yourself rather than following blindly.

Curse of the Broomstaff is excellent and I can’t wait for the fourth (and neither can my children).

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Comments

  1. I am currently reading two booksmI absolutely love. I can’t pay you to review them, but I wouldn’t mind hearing your review anyway. “Wednesday Wars” and “Okay for Now”

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